LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Fremer Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

Before there was an Internet, before cell-phones but after smoke signals, news of this remarkable Leo Kottke album with the black and white armadillo cover spread throughout the “underground” almost immediately upon its release in 1969 on John Fahey’s Takoma Records label.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Dennis Wilson didn�t sing very well in the conventional sense of the word: his pitch was frequently off, he warbled, his vocal timbre was raspy and calling his range �limited� would be an overstatement.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

It always seemed as if there was a great recording lurking under the glaze of the original 1994 CD release. Finally, 14 years later Pure Pleasure gives us an answer: yes! Wow is there a great recording here on Keb' Mo's audacious, country/blues/soul debut.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Very few singers can get this close to a dry microphone, be balanced way forward of the backup band and sound as good as Peggy Lee does on this series of standards backed by a pair of small ensembles, recorded in 1953 and 1956. Neither the original nor the reissue notes explain the album’s temporal context so perhaps there’s no story there.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Before there was Norah, Diana, Patricia, or even Jacintha, there was Julie London. Just as audiophiles today seem to gravitate towards sexy, breathy singers, audiophiles in the mid-fifties found themselves inextricably connected to Ms. London, thanks in great part to the Liberty Records original ((LRP-3006), issued December, 1955.

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Brent Raynor Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

There is two kinds of music, the good and the bad�

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Nick Katsafanas Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

In his first commercial release since 2005�s folk-laden Hotel ; Moby brings the eclectic Last Night . The album could be considered Moby�s return to the high-tempo dance music, which brought about his late 1990s fame. Whereas Hotel explored the synergy (and sometimes lack of) between guitar-strumming light rock and bass heavy electronica, Last Night is pure dance. Moby does not lend his voice to the double album�s 14 songs, but his cast of vocalists highlights his arranging skills.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

The timbre may have deepened, though almost imperceptibly, but caressing the soft, melodic waves of this set of tidily drawn, dreamy reveries, k.d. lang�s voice remains a magnificent, mellifluous instrument.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

This band of British rock and roll survivors led by David Gedge has been at it since 1985, releasing their debut LP George Best (named after a famous �60�s era soccer star) two years later on their own Reception Records label.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

True, The Who were once called The High Numbers, but can you imagine a more self-loathing album title than The Who By Numbers? Painting by numbers or doing anything by "the numbers" usually connotes rote work. It was an honest assessment of the album.

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