LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

Steve Earle’s dusty, gritty tribute to his late friend Townes Van Zandt issued last year is about what you can usually expect from “tribute” albums. The two met when Earle was still a kid and Van Zandt was already established.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

Making a publicity appearance on the Jimmy Fallon show for the latest reissue of Exile on Main Street, Keith Richards professed a preference for vinyl. The audience applauded. Has an expression of a preference for CD ever gotten such a reaction—at least in the last decade? Not likely.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

Listening to Elvis makes clear his indebtedness to Dean Martin and Bryan Ferry’s to Elvis. No doubt Paul McCartney was imitating growing up too. There’s not been a voice like it since, which for detractors is a good thing.  

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

This 1957 set spotlights the obscure Chicago alto sax hard bop player John Jenkins who led but one Blue Note session and three altogether in his short recording career, which he ended in the early '60s. 

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

Elvis’s first post-Army album created a sensation when it was released just one month after he entered Nashville Studio B on March 20th, 1960, two week after his release from the Army. Unfortunately, for Presley and RCA Elvis Is Back!  wasn’t a big seller because it didn’t contain any hits. Presley had been away for two years.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

The first Costello album backed by The Attractions released in March, 1978 on Radar in the UK and Columbia in America (with differing song lineups) cemented the singer’s leadership in the “angry young man” wing of the late ‘70’s “New Wave” musical explosion. More than expressing anger, the album was a full-blown misogynist outburst that contains some really nasty stuff starting with the opener “No Action,” which is filled some deliciously ugly obsessive/compulsive sentiments.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

The opener to this heavily produced album “We Belong Together” owes its existence to Bruce Springsteen, but most of the rest channels Laura Nyro.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

Carla Thomas mocked Otis Redding as unsophisticated and “pure country” in their classic recorded duet “Tramp” and when Otis welcomes the “…ladies and gentlemens” to one of his Whisky A Go Go sets back in April of 1966 you get the picture.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 0 comments

Drawn from a list of "100 Essential Country Songs" her dad penciled on a yellow legal pad after realizing that his young daughter didn't know any of what he considered to be part of his, and therefore her musical DNA, Roseanne Cash's The List is a full circle tribute to her father Johnny and her musical homecoming. It's an album the elder Cash would have been thrilled to hear.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Sep 01, 2010 1 comments

Chris Darrow may not be a name familiar to you, nor might Kaleidoscope, the ‘60s psych/folk band on Epic of which he was part. That band passed me by back then. Maybe I didn’t like the cover art, or thought Epic wasn’t in the same solid A&R league as was Elektra for instance, so I didn’t want to chance it. I never heard them on the radio and Epic probably did a crappy job promoting them.

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