LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 08, 2010 1 comments
Why bother with three phono preamps most of us can't afford? For the same reason the enthusiast automobile magazines cover the newest Ferraris and Lamborghinis: just reading about them is fun.
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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

Sadly, during the early '60s Muddy Waters and other Chicago blues masters were better known to white English youth than to their American counterparts. Mick and Keith weren't alone in their fandom. Search YouTube and you'll find an amazing Howlin' Wolf performance before an adoring audience of well-scrubbed English white kids that was probably never repeated in America where blues was dubbed "race music" and relegated  to the ghettos.

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Wayne Shelor Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

Rock ‘n’ roll historians invariably trace the roots of the now-expansive, constantly morphing music to a Mississippi bluesman named Robert Johnson, a 1930s guitarist who ostensibly made a deal with the devil – trading his mortal soul for stellar talent - one night at a rural intersection (a “crossroads”). Johnson’s canon of songs, bolstered by his pioneer legacy and dark mythology, is embraced universally as being instrumental to the very structure of rock ‘n’ roll.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

Kitsch fans alert! This obscure 1960 oddity by composer/arranger Bob Thompson consists of a dozen short, lushly orchestrated impressions of various forms of transportation, each introduced with a stereo high-fidelity sound effect recording of a train, ocean liner, motor scooter, sports car, Intercontinental Ballistic Missile, or what have you.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

The Beatles made four unforgettable live appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 16, 23rd 1964, and one more, over a year and a half later on September 12, 1965—forty five years ago this coming September 12th, which is five days after the re-release of this fascinating and endlessly entertaining 2 DVD set.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

This psychedelic noise-rock band from Japan is  definitely not for everyone but if your tastes run towards free-jazz when you think of jazz and you find the opening of Axis: Bold As Love structurally symphonic, you will surely dig Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso  U.F.O. and this album in particular, which definitely has a Hendrix vibe, right down to the cover art that has lettering like Are You Experience and some scantily clad gals like the UK Track edition of Electric Ladyland  that Jimi hated. 

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

If you were around when the second Jimi Hendrix album was released you probably got ripped off. After Reprise’s success with Are You Experienced?Capitol dusted off a Curtis Knight and the Squires album that Hendrix had played on as a sideman before forming The Jimi Hendrix Experience and using a recent photo, issued it as Get That FeelingJimi Hendrix Plays and Curtis Knight Sings.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

This hard /progrock trio never got the media hype and they are rarely mentioned outside their own musical world, but Muse has made it big. How? The old fashioned way: hard work in the studio and constant touring. They have an intensely loyal fan base. Their worldwide touring grosses are impressive and they chart  well around the world

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

Clearly, releasing this as a double 180g vinyl set  was an act of musical idealism and not because someone at Mobile Fidelity thought vinyl fans and audiophiles were clamoring for it.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

It’s difficult to believe this November 18th, 1993 Sony Music Studios performance is almost seventeen years old. Though it aired on MTV a month later, it wasn’t issued on vinyl or CD until November 1st, 1994, six months after Kurt Cobain’s suicide.

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