LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

The relationship between Jewish-Americans and African Americans has been long, complicated, confusing, controversial and not without reciprocal animosity. Yet, clearly as this fascinating collection of African-American artists singing Jewish songs demonstrates, there’s also been a lot of mutual love and support.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments



The poet/singer Gil Scott-Heron struck a raw nerve in the early '70s  with "The Revolution Will Not be Televised," a sarcastic, simmering three minute taunt set to a flute, drum and bass soaked jazz backing track that  sounds today more like Beatnik parody than jazz.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Glen Rock New Jersey is a small town in Northern Bergen County.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

This is not Sam Beam's (A/K/A Iron and Wine) latest album. It dates from 2007. His first release, The Creek Drank the Cradle, was released back in 2002. Somehow that one, this one, his newest and all of his work escaped my attention until last year's AXPONA audio show in Jacksonville Florida where I saw the collected works in the bins of a Florida audio store owner who had a room at the show. I asked to hear something and he played a cut from this introspective, atmospheric and sonically enticing and well-produced album. I was hooked.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Dixie Chicken and Sailin' Shoes are the meat of the LIttle Feat catalog, with Dixie Chicken arguably being the group's finest studio effort.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 2 comments
More of an informal sampler than a comprehensive look, James P. Goss’s “Vinyl Lives” offers a fascinating glimpse into the mindset of folks both sufficiently crazy and persistent to own record stores in the face of the Internet download juggernaut.
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Roger Hahn Posted: Jan 01, 2011 4 comments

"Our Man in New Orleans" Roger Hahn asked to review  the book "Bayou Underground" by Dave Thompson.We said "yes." A book review turned into an epic report filled with great holiday giving book suggestions for your music loving friends—particularly those who love New Orleans and its musical heritage—ed.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments
I wrote this article, originally published in Music Connection magazine, back in 1985 after becoming increasingly disgusted with and alarmed by the deteriorating sonic quality of new releases from familiar artists. Little did I realize then that 1985 was a 'golden age' of good sound compared to what most pop and rock recordings sound like in 2008! I remain grateful to editor Bud Scoppa for giving me the platform to spout a then unpopular view in a magazine read by Los Angeles engineers, artists and music business executives.

When The Absolute Sound's Harry Pearson announced he was looking for a new popular music editor, I applied for the job by sending him this article. He liked it enough to give me the job. That gave me an ideal platform from which to advocate saving the vinyl record and extolling its unique set of virtues, sonic and otherwise.

Watching the LP section at the huge Tower Records on Sunset shrink by the week, never did I imagine that in 2008 the LP would be back and Tower would be gone. —Michael Fremer, 1/15/08

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments
My grandmother used to think everyone was Jewish. Sunday night she watched "The Ed Solomon Show." She told us Tony Curtis was Jewish and Dinah Shore and even Danny Kay and Kirk Douglas. We thought the Holocaust had kind of twisted her thinking but aside from Ed "Solomon" she was right!
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Michael Fremer Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

How bad were the original Beatles CDs issued back in 1987? So bad that even the clueless conditioned to believe that CDs represented an automatic sonic step up from vinyl noticed something was terribly wrong.

Amusing to some observers was the nature of the complaints: “they sound tinny,” “they sound flat,” “they sound thin and bright,” “they’re harsh and edgy,” “where’s the warmth?” etc.

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