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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 2 comments

This Rolling Stones discography written for issue 4 of The Tracking Angle, may have gathered some moss, but it still has some valuable information for Stones LP collectors
(Photo shows American distributed UK pressed FFRR edition of Out of Our Heads)

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

This Rolling Stones discography written for issue 4 of The Tracking Angle, may have gathered some moss, but it still has some valuable information for Stones LP collectors (Photo shows Decca UK FFSS Their Satanic Majesties Request

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

The third and final part of The Rolling Stones discography

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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments
Ideally, LPs should be played with the pickup stylus remaining tangential (ie, at a 90° angle) to the groove—just as the lacquer from which the LP was ultimately stamped was cut in the first place. Over the years, many attempts have been made to accomplish this. Back in 1877, Thomas A. Edison's original machines tangentially tracked his cylinders, but Emil Berliner's invention of the flat disc put an end to cylinders altogether. In the 1950s, a number of companies marketed so-called "tangential" trackers that used dual arms, based on conventional pivoting arrangements, to change the angle at which the headshell was mounted as it moved across the LP side. In 1963, Marantz introduced the SLT-12, which used a plastic pantograph to move the stylus across the record surface. Garrard's Zero 100 pivoting arm controlled its independently pivoting headshell with a bar that extended from the main bearing of the tonearm.
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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 1 comments

Well this is embarrassing: I've played often and enjoyed this excellent sounding reissue featuring L.A. based anglophile singer/songwriter Emitt Rhodes in preparation for this write-up but the record has gotten lost here somewhere.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 1 comments

Recorded in glorious mono in 1956 and issued first in 1957, this set of small combo standards with Cole both singing and playing the piano remains as fresh and vital as it did when originally released. 

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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

In an indie-rock era saturated with smirky, slacker irony, the roots-rocker Ray La Montagne comes across as downright solemn. He and his group execute cleanly and almost reverentially, funk, blues, jazz and country, which La Montagne sings in a honey coated gruff voice that veers between Joe Cocker and Tim Hardin. The man is sincere and like Tim Hardin, he knows how to move three chord rounds. 

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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

Trumpeter Kenny Dorham brought Joe Henderson to Blue Note and on the late tenor saxophonist's second lead album gives him strong support as the two chase each other through some zig-zag bop thickets. "Teeter Totter," the fast-paced Henderson-penned opener alone is worth the price of admission but the other tracks simmer with equal intensity.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

You could argue the advisability of naming a sophomore effort Everybody Digs Bill Evans but today it’s clear that everybody in fact does, or still does depending on your feelings about that second album’s title.

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Michael Fremer Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

What possessed Amanda Palmer to cover Radiohead playing her "magic ukelele"? Who knows? Did this inspire Eddie Vedder to issue a ukelele-based record? What would Arthur Godfrey think of all of this (look him up if you're too young to know who he is)?

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