LATEST ADDITIONS

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Michael Fremer Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

“Body snatching” aliens invade earth and disappear among the populace. Someone discovers that playing Black Sabbath’s song “Paranoid” causes the aliens to melt. It’s mankind’s only hope for survival. But not any version of “Paranoid” works: only pure analog ones do—either on vinyl or tape. Used copies become scarce. Turntable sales rise…

From that premise author Mitch Myers conjures up detailed and often hilarious scenarios, capping the vignette with a surprise ending sure to elicit a physical reaction.

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Roger Hahn Posted: Jun 01, 2008 2 comments

(As we approach the August 29th 2007 second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we thought it a good time to reflect on the pathetic response by the Bush administration then and now and to present our man in New Orleans's Roger Hahn's coverage of last spring's New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festivaled.)

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

This record makes Scott Walker’s last two bleak outings sound positively festive. Harvey has never been an easy listen throughout her decade plus career. She could be dark, abusive, angry, pained, vulnerable, strong and raw-edged, but she could never be easy and she’s not here, as ghostly and pained a musical figure as you’re likely to encounter on record.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Before the folk revival of the 1950’s and ‘60’s fomented by the likes of The Weavers and later The Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul and Mary, there were the originals like Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly. He was born in the 1880’s (exact date unknown) and he died in New York City, December 6th, 1949 of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, better known as “Lou Gehrigs Disease.”

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

To live as the non-English speaking world experiences our pop music, you might try this record of familiar Leonard Cohen songs sung in Swedish by Jan Erik Lundqvist. So popular are Mr. Lundqvist’s interpretations that he’s put out two volumes. This first one dates from 2002, which Meyer records reissuing it on 180 gram vinyl more recently. Leonard Cohen apparently approves.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

John Cale's guitar-fueled, angry yet nostalgic first Island release from 1974 is easily his finest solo effort in my book. It's certainly his most consistently well written and performed record.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Another Pure Pleasure mono reissue more important for the music than for “audiophile sound,” which these 1950 and 1951 mono sessions surely are not.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Dexter Calling , recorded May, 9th, 1961, just a few days after Gordon’s Blue Note debut session, opens with “Soul Sister,” a “chicken and biscuits” track the tenor saxophonist wrote for the West Coast edition of “The Connection,” which Freddie Redd had scored for the East Coast original. The tune’s slow, bluesy, Southern-tinged melody, played in ¾ waltz-time sounds like something Floridian Cannonball Adderley might have penned though Gordon grew up in Los Angeles, son of a prominent physician who tended to the likes of Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Recorded in 1976, this audiophile classic sounds as astonishingly natural today as it did back then, only much better now given the improvements in modern analog playback gear.

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Michael Fremer Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Say what you will about the slick, commercial Nashville sound that’s evolved from the fine “countrypolitan” one developed by Chet Atkins and crew at RCA Studio B back in the ‘60’s, at least they still have great studios, skilled engineers and teams of tasty lick players in Music City, all of which are on display here.

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