LATEST ADDITIONS

Michael Fremer  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

The time between receiving this and finally writing about it is ludicrous. I’m almost embarrassed to post this in March of 2006. It’s been covered more extensively than most new jazz albums and I wouldn’t be surprised if it outsold most of them as well. On the other hand this music hasn’t been heard in almost 50 years, so what’s a more few months?

Michael Fremer  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Always the teacher, Julian “Cannonball” Adderley commences this live set from 1959 with a backgrounder on the difference between church music and soul church music, before launching into Bobby Timmons’s “This Hear,” with the composer on piano, Adderley on alto sax, brother Nat on cornet and the rhythm section of Louis Hayes on drums and Sam Jones on bass setting up a crowd-pleasing soulful groove.

Michael Fremer  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

You’ll just have to get over the squashed, harmonically truncated and bleached sound that infects much of this musically outstanding album from 2002 (they’ve released more albums since) from this 15 member Canadian collective if you have any hope of enjoying it.

Michael Fremer  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Donovan may claim to not be a Dylan wannabe, but when you listen to "Catch the Wind," this compilation's opener, his claim rings hollow. It's so Dylan, so "Chimes of Freedom," and so derivative, there's no escaping the Dylan in him.

Michael Fremer  |  Apr 01, 2006  |  0 comments

The first time I recall hearing a vibraphone was on a record at E.J. Korvette's. I was perusing the vinyl back in 1960 something or other when the store clerk put on a copy of Terry Gibb's That Swing Thing (Verve V6-8447), cuing up Bobby Timmon's catchy as the flu "Moanin'" which this clueless suburban adolescent had never heard.

Michael Fremer  |  Mar 05, 2006  |  First Published: Dec 31, 1969  |  0 comments

Decision by Sony leads to change, ABKCO claims

Michael Fremer  |  Feb 06, 2006  |  First Published: Dec 31, 1969  |  3 comments

Who engineered The Searchers tunes? \"Mystery\" solved!

Michael Fremer  |  Feb 01, 2006  |  0 comments

The great drummer Art Blakey, still playing ferociously at age 62 when this Keystone Korner live set was recorded January, 1982, was a great believer in giving young talent gigging opportunities. He also was an excellent judge of the up-and-coming, and over the years he helped develop many major jazz artists, including Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard and Hank Mobley, as well as Wynton and Branford Marsalis, both of whom are spotlighted on this record. In fact, it was Branford’s recording debut.

Michael Fremer  |  Feb 01, 2006  |  0 comments

This Memphis Slim record is special because it was an impromptu session, occurring at the end of his first “scripted” Candid date. As the tunes rolled out, it became clear to producer Nat Hentoff that Memphis’s playlist was comprised of “Traveling Music.” The blues great suggested the album title. I learned all of this from the liner notes.

Michael Fremer  |  Feb 01, 2006  |  0 comments

Considered a sprawling, self-indulgent mess when first released in 1967 (RCA LOP-1511 mono/LSO-1511 stereo), and a warning to other bands and to record executives footing the bills for unlimited studio time (even the extra dollar added to the list price couldn't have paid for the studio time), After Bathing At Baxter’s has worn remarkably well, and in retrospect is a powerful, smoldering document reflecting a chaotic, violent and dangerous time in America—the kind of time we’d be having now if people would fucking wake up and smell the fascism.

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