LATEST ADDITIONS

Michael Fremer  |  Sep 02, 2021  |  31 comments
Joni Mitchell first came to the attention of some folk music enthusiasts from the three songs heard on Tom Rush’s 1968 release The Circle Game (Elektra 74018). Rush covers “Tin Angel”, “Urge For Going” and of course “The Circle Game.” Rush also covers on the album songs from Jackson Browne and James Taylor before they too became well known.

Mark Dawes  |  Aug 31, 2021  |  5 comments
Mungo’s Hi Fi is Glasgow’s biggest reggae sound system and named after the city’s patron saint. You may not be expecting such a thing in the rainswept streets of Scotland’s biggest city, but since 2001 Mungo’s Hi Fi has been producing reggae music, putting out over 90 releases on its own Scotch Bonnet record label, building a sound system and running numerous club nights. They have collaborated with some of reggae’s biggest vocalists, including Sugar Minott and Cornell Campbell, as well as current voices such as Soom T, Eva Lazarus, and Charlie P. This latest release from September 2020 brings to the mic Italian vocalist and songwriter Marina P.

Malachi Lui  |  Aug 31, 2021  |  5 comments
In February 1991, seminal space rock band Spacemen 3 released their long-delayed swan song, Recurring. During its long recording process, the group’s core members J. Spaceman (Jason Pierce) and Sonic Boom (Peter Kember) constantly fought; instead of composing together, Kember and Pierce had their own stylistically different LP sides. Pierce finished his side (side 2 on the original vinyl) relatively quickly. Kember, meanwhile, for months endlessly toiled away at his mixes until the group’s manager Gerald Palmer confiscated the tapes.

Michael Fremer, Malachi Lui  |  Aug 29, 2021  |  6 comments
This July, Billie Eilish released her highly anticipated second LP, Happier Than Ever. After some contention as to who would review this release, AnalogPlanet editor Michael Fremer and contributing editor Malachi Lui agreed to both comment on it. Below is their conversation about the record.

Malachi Lui  |  Aug 27, 2021  |  8 comments
(Review Explosion is a recurring AnalogPlanet feature covering recent releases for which we either don't have sufficient time to fully explore, or that are not worthy of it. Curated by AnalogPlanet contributing editor Malachi Lui, Review Explosion focuses on the previous few months' new releases and reissues.)

Michael Fremer  |  Aug 26, 2021  |  23 comments
As expected, The Beatles' post-break up Let It Be album gets a Giles Martin re-mix and will be available worldwide October 15th 2021 in multiple editions. For the new release Martin and engineer Sam Okell produced stereo, 5.1 surround DTS and Dolby Atmos mixes. The new stereo mix sourced directly from the original session and rooftop performance 8 track tapes were "guided by the original "reproduced for disc" Phil Spector version.

Michael Fremer  |  Aug 25, 2021  |  19 comments
The late and great comedian Jackie Mason once quipped “You know who invented sushi? Not the Japanese! Jews invented sushi! Who else would figure out a way to open a restaurant without having to invest in a kitchen?

Malachi Lui  |  Aug 24, 2021  |  9 comments
(Vinyl Reports is an AnalogPlanet feature aiming to create a definitive vinyl LP guide. Here, we talk about sound quality, LP packaging, music, and the overarching vinyl experience.)

Michael Fremer  |  Aug 22, 2021  |  25 comments
The Rolling Stones just announced a series of 40th anniversary, expanded editions of Tattoo You, the group's multi-platinum 1981 release from Polydor/Interscope/UMe.

Michael Fremer  |  Aug 20, 2021  |  10 comments
Shakey Pictures Records and Reprise Records announced today The Neil Young Official Bootleg Series, which will commence with an official release of Neil's legendary December 4th, 1970 Carnegie Hall debut show available now for pre-order at The Greedy Hand Store at Neil Young Archives. A bootlegged version of the later midnight show helped make the evening among Neil's most fabled appearances, but according to the press release the earlier show, not captured by bootleggers, was the better one.

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