At C.E.S. 2017 Air-Tight's "Colorful" New ATE-X Vacuum Tube-Based MM Phono Preamplifier

At CES 2017 in importer Axxis Audio's room, Japan-based Air-Tight introduced the ATM-3211 a new 100 watt 211 tube-based push-pull mono block amplifier, as well as the ATE-X vacuum tube-based MM phono preamplifier.

It's unusual to divide up each curve's time constants into two separately adjustable sections, which is what led to the inelegantly posed question about it. Also note there's a 'flat' choice, where there's no EQ applied, which can be useful when digitizing with a program like Pure Vinyl, which can apply the selected curve digitally.

I know AES is another phono EQ but it's one not often seen so when I said "what is this for" I meant for what records (labels)? I know of none, so I find it an odd choice, when they also chose to omit Columbia or another more widely used curve from the mono era.

I suspect they had a reason for choosing AES but C.E.S. wasn't a good place for that kind of digging. Both at this time are PTD (price to be determined), but I suspect the amp's letters "ATM" are probably a leading indicator.

COMMENTS
Austin Baker's picture

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Glotz's picture

I am really intrigued by this unit, as with all of the Air Tight gear. Those amps are super sweet looking, and I imagine, sounding as well. Love that Grey and orange style.. have for years.

Does the preamp allow insertion of a Step up in between the curves? Innovative, if so!

Glotz's picture

need a revamp! Pretty un-Air Tight.

vinyl listener's picture

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